What's a Rebus?

 

Kel Heyl : When I was about eight I was in a library and found a book that contained all sorts of puzzles.  The book fell open to a rebus : the first panel was laundry drying on a line; the second panel contained the letters '-' 'i' 'n' 'g'; the third panel was a pyramidal shape with a label on the side that said '2000 lbs'

The answer swam from one part of my mind to another.  It just surfaced.  There was no effort : "Washington".  Architecture can be thought of as a rebus.  A puzzle to be solved.  A combination of signs and symbols.  Some elements are just concrete - they mean nothing more and nothing less than they exist.  They work against gravity, snow and cold.  Other stone shapes recall earlier construction methods in wood, like the ancient Greek temples.  High Gothic cathedrals have a cross shaped plan.   The Abbot Suger equated the Holy Spirit with light and incorporated large clerestory windows in the cathedrals to fill them with Spirit.  Particular furniture can solve the riddle, "What's this room used for?" 

It would be fun to build a Rubik's Cube for ten thousand people to live and work.

What we never want is for our work to become this sort of puzzle :

"What were they thinking?" 

Studio Rebus Incorporated 

510 Sibley Street  Suite 503  Saint Paul  Minnesota  55101 

763 412 8070